Teaching Overview

I have worked as an assistant instructor for the following undergraduate courses at Princeton University. See course descriptions and student evaluations below.

 Results from the final class experiment

Results from the final class experiment

Experimental Methods in Politics (Fall 2016 with Prof. Valenzuela)

Description: The use of experiments to study and influence politics is widespread and growing, partly because they can give conclusive results not possible with surveys or other data. No longer confined to the lab, political scientists and campaign operatives use new technology to conduct experiments on thousands of voters in real elections. Massive political experiments have been conducted on Facebook, by mail and telephone, but is it ethical to influence politics in pursuit of new knowledge? What have experiments taught us about voting, race, and representation in America? This class will cover these and other aspects of using experiments in politics.

 A sample plot from a class assignment

A sample plot from a class assignment

Applied Quantitative Analysis (Spring 2016 with Prof. Wasow)

Description: In a world awash in data, how can we distinguish signals from noise? This course focuses on developing an intuition for statistics and applying it through data analysis, regression models and a final project. We will wrestle with what makes a good research question, play with data to see how statistical methods can help us make sense of real world concerns, and work at communicating quantitative findings clearly to broad audiences. Particular attention will be paid to applying these techniques in Junior Papers and Senior Theses. Coursework involves using the R statistical platform.

 A plot on "selective media exposure" 

A plot on "selective media exposure" 

The Mass media, social media, and American politics (Fall 2017 with Prof. Guess)

Description: This course considers the role of the media in American politics and the influence of mass and social media on Americans’ political attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. We will examine the nature of news and news-making organizations, the role of the news media in electoral campaigns, how the media shape the behavior of politicians once in office, political advertising, and the ability of social media to facilitate collective action. The course is designed both to impart information and to raise issues which may not have clear or easy answers. This will especially be the case when we discuss the role of the internet and social media in contemporary American politics. Precepts are a critical part of the class as they provide an opportunity to grapple with these issues –– to explore the pros and cons of objectivity as a journalistic norm, the ways in which news and entertainment have become blurred in the mass media, whether social media contributes to political polarization, and so on.